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6 months ago

Almost at 5k visitors in two weeks with about $700 on ads. Revenue so far?

Almost at 5k visitors in two weeks with about $700 on ads. Revenue so far? $230 from 2 customers. What am I doing wrong? Is this pretty normal?

 

Just abandoned carts alone is around $1000. If those were actual orders, I would be very happy.

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6 months ago
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Hey Min, 

 

I just took a very quick look at your site. 

 

It all seems pretty good - you seem to have most of the basics covered. 

 

The one thing that stood out to me was that you aren't really selling your products. 

 

I'll show you what I am talking about - here is a description from one of your products: 

 

7A Love Latte Unprocessed Brazilian Virgin Human Hair

Lowest price Brazilian Remy hair you can find! Massive discounts for purchasing bundled hairs rather than buying each separate pieces. Includes free closure for hassle free styling.

  • Includes 3 bundles
  • Free closure piece
  • Perm, Bleach, Dye
  • Wash & Reuse

 

It describes the technical details of the product. That's fine, because customers will want to know that information. 

 

But you have to think about this...

 

Why are your customers buying these products?

 

Because they want hair extensions? 

 

Not really. They want the benefits that the hair extensions will bring them.

 

Things like: 

  • how they will feel after they start using the product
  • how they can use it to improve their appearance/turn heads/attract compliments/improve confidence, etc
  • how they will be able to style their hair exactly as they want
  • how the product looks and feels exactly like the real thing (nobody would ever know it isn't their real hair)
  • if they can use their existing styling tools (straighteners, hair spray, curling tongs)
  • how durable they hair is/how long it will last (what makes it so durable?) 
  • how the hair is comfortable enough to wear all day, customers tell you that they forget it is even there (for example)
  • what other people have thought of the product, how they have used it, etc 
  • and so on. 

 

I came up with that list in a couple of minutes and I've never sold a hair piece in my life. There's probably loads more to add too. 

 

Think about it - your customer is sitting at their computer screen or looking at a phone. They can't touch the product, feel it, smell it.

 

In ecommerce you have to go all out in your descriptions to compensate for that. You have to take them with you. You have to speak to their desires and fears.

 

You're not selling a hair piece - you're selling how they will feel when they are wearing your hair piece. 

 

Bulking up your product descriptions will give you a double whammy benefit.

 

Not only will it help your conversions, it will help your products rank higher in organic search. In time, that could reduce your reliance on paid traffic.

 

As for the abandoned cart - get an abandoned cart email sequence up and running quickly - you should able to recoup quite a portion of those lost sales. Worst case scenario, you might get some feedback about why the carts are being abandoned - it might be something you can fix. 

 

Finally - your Contact Us button in your footer seems to be broken. At least it's not working for me!

 

I hope you find this useful Min. I'm sure there are other things you can improve (we can all always improve), but that's what stood out most to me. 

 

Good luck! 

 

Nigel

 

Analogy Marketing - Shopify Partner

 

Analogy Marketing is a Shopify Partner Ecommerce Marketing Agency focused exclusively on Digital Marketing, Advertising, and SEO for Shopify stores.
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5 months ago
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Not enough payment options perhaps?

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5 months ago
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I could say you need to change this or that or you need to do this or that like a huge number of people on here who seem to enjoy handing out advice on whatever they think is the converse of how a shop looks.

The truth is, the real winners are the people who are behind the Shopify platform. Sadly most shops regardless of how optimised they are or how good they look or how fantastic the products will be lucky to make the monthly fee Shopify charge back.

Cue rabid replies of how our shop makes thousands per month, but this is the reality. 

Remember, in the American gold rush, it wasn’t the minors that made the most money, it was the people who made the picks, shovels and ropes.

For Shopify, it provides massive profits on the dream they promote of running your own online business. To see how cynical they are, ask yourself why so many of the apps cost so much per month for functionality they could add for free but don’t as the cut they get from them is too lucrative to add to basic shop setups.

If music be the food of love...play on.
Posts:
1
5 months ago

I design and manufacture 99% of my products I sell. Those other few items I don't advertise really. Keep in mind, visitors will look and then google the exact same item and buy the one that is cheaper. Especially if it's the exact same brand/color/SKU. If you want to sell the same item as someone else and do it better you do need videos and personality and your brand to do more than just sell the item. 

I hope this helps think through the process. The site looks good but it will take a lot more to earn their trust. Also, I get thousands of visitors from google and low conversions but thousands of visitors from facebook and they convert better. It's not all the same. Know your demographics. 

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5 months ago
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I agree 100% with Ged, that's the best advice I've read on this forum for a long time.

naveenkumar Member
Posts:
2
5 months ago

I had looked into you store keenly a fraction of mistake can change the entire result in e-commerce either ways its good or bad your store need a fraction of optimization that is your products to be picky means research about the products in your niche and then brings the best product into your store dont load you store with bunch of products and promote the good products cross or upsell related products to that product if you are promoting brush target brush audience need more help reply me

Posts:
1
5 months ago

I don’t know much about hair - but I know that the pop up right away and that other pop up that keeps on telling me that “someone has purchased” is annoying af and screams spammy to me 

 

everyone gets bombarded with this junk all over the internet, I would love to hear from a site that says those two things actually help 

 

in my opinion both of those options lose more than you gain 

 

 

Posts:
1
5 months ago

Hi Nigel

Thanks for that great information in response to Min Chung's concern above.

I have just one question:

Can you perhaps draft an example of how we should word the benefits on the website that sells these hair extensions ?  I understand the benefits you are referring to but conveying those benefits to the prospective buyer in the correct manner is crucial to closing the deal.

Many Thanks

Collin M

Posts:
1
5 months ago

Hi guys, 

I have a similar problem, lots of traffic from Facebook (using remarketing dynamic ads and etc) but still people don't want to buy. I have also many abandoned carts. I have a 3 email strategy trying to recover them. The new things now is “card declined”, anyone faced similar issues? Please suggest thank you in advance.

 

Posts:
10
5 months ago

Ok, so this topic kind of blew up today lol.

It's been about a month since this post, and I gotta say, things are looking better.

I've made around $1800 last month, and I've already broken $2300 this month.

I am slowly but surely growing, and that's all that matters to me at this point.

Thanks for the all the replies everyone!

Posts:
4
5 months ago

@Min Chung. Would you mind sharing what you changed between then and now? It may help us. Our store is www.mothererth.com. 


Thank you!

Posts:
135
Last edited 5 months ago

Hello Min,

Nice website you have got there but yes scopes for improvements are of course there.

1. Most importantly, first you need to create you brand image (so that people can rely on you). Otherwise why will people not buy from some already established market space offering the same price (without discount for some of the products).

2. Let people know how your products are going to create positive impact in their lifestyle. Detailing your product's description briefly can help.

3. Creating traffic can be done by ads but to achieve conversion rate is difficult task. It needs time to be trustworthy in market.

4. By putting better images which can help your customers to get the real sense of the product can help to enlarge sales margin.

This blog may help you: https://www.shopify.ca/blog/15086345-8-marketing-tactics-and-apps-that-turn-shoppers-into-buyers

For any kind of image editing service you can contact our image editing application: https://apps.shopify.com/cutoutwiz

You will have free processing for 10 images

 

Thanks- Kaoser

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Last edited 5 months ago
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Remember, in the American gold rush, it wasn’t the minors that made the most money, it was the people who made the picks, shovels and ropes.

Hey Ged, 

You're raising a valid point there. 

There are a lot of Shopify stores that don't make money. 

I suppose in Shopify's defence, they would say that they only make money while their customers' stores are operational.

If stores are making a loss, they are more likely to cancel their subscription. If stores are doing well, they are more likely to stay. That means more monthly recurring revenue for Shopify shareholders. 

So Shopify's interests and their customers' interests are aligned in that respect. 

In my work at our agency, I've spent far more time analysing Shopify stores than I would like to admit.

Hours and hours and hours. 

And that's not just individual Shopify stores. I've studied as much data as I can get my hands on regarding the performance of Shopify stores right across the spectrum. From big sites doing huge monthly revenues from hundreds of thousands of monthly visitors, right down to the little stores getting 10 visits a day from Facebook ads. 

Obviously, the following is just speculation on my part - you would have to ask Shopify themselves to get a definitive answer.

But my best guess (based on the data I can find) is that the Shopify customer base follows a rough 80/20 distribution when it comes to performance. 

That would suggest that the bulk of the volume is being done by a relatively small portion of stores concentrated towards the top. These are the big names that everyone has heard of.

Below that there is a larger subsection of stores that still perform very well. I can't give you figures, but suffice to say, there are plenty of businesses there that are making their owners very wealthy. 

Then the drop-off in performance accelerates. And you eventually find yourself in an environment where there is a large number of stores that do very little or nothing. 

It's important to point out that if I am correct in this (and I'm open to correction if I'm wrong), it would be an entirely natural distribution to have. The same 80/20 distribution replicates everywhere - business, nature, creative endeavors, etc. Generally speaking, the majority of production is generated by a relatively small number of entities. 

You also have to bear in mind that Shopify has virtually no barriers to entry in terms of time or money.

So in that environment it would make sense that there are a lot of stores that don't really get the work and attention required to push up into the higher areas of performance within the distribution. 

I've also been doing analysis to define common characteristics across stores that perform extremely well and those that perform poorly. But I haven't finished that undertaking yet, and even if I had, it's probably a story for another day.  

I appreciate the discussion though Ged, and would welcome any insight any other people might have in this area.

Any Shopify staff care to comment, on the off-chance?   :-) 

Nigel

Analogy Marketing - More Traffic, More Sales, More Profit. Guaranteed. 

Analogy Marketing is a Shopify Partner Ecommerce Marketing Agency focused exclusively on Digital Marketing, Advertising, and SEO for Shopify stores.
Posts:
26
5 months ago

Hi Nigel

Thanks for that great information in response to Min Chung's concern above.

I have just one question:

Can you perhaps draft an example of how we should word the benefits on the website that sells these hair extensions ?  I understand the benefits you are referring to but conveying those benefits to the prospective buyer in the correct manner is crucial to closing the deal.

Many Thanks

Collin M

 

Hi Collin, 

Rather than writing a draft for you, I can do something much better. 

I can tell you 2 of the most important things you should be thinking about when you are writing your own descriptions.

If you apply these tips, you'll improve your copy across all your products. Not just one or two. 

Even better, because it will be you writing the descriptions and not someone else (who doesn't know your market), it will be much more authentic. You'll see why this is important in a moment. 

And it's not just product descriptions - these lessons apply to all writing on your website. Emails, policies, homepage, content marketing, everything.  

 

Number 1 - You need to think about what common values your customers have. For hair extensions - I'm not active in that market, but I suppose some common values would be improving appearance, developing confidence, etc. You'll know your customers better than me. The key is to identify what these common values are, make a list of them, and refer to them regularly throughout your website copy. 

 

Number 2 - Speak to your customers in their language. If you are selling to 15 year old girls, your descriptions better not sound like they were written by a crusty 55 year old man. Equally, if you are selling to middle-aged women, you probably won't want to have emojis and the word "bae" everywhere.

 

Do you understand what I am getting at?

Think about what you are doing when you combine both of the tips above.

When you talk to your customers about what their concerns are, and you do so in a way that is familiar to them, that creates an instant connection.

The customer suddenly knows that you understand them.

You are one of them.

When customers know that you understand them, they will buy from you (I'll tell you a story about this in a second). This is hugely important - I can't stress it enough.

If you don't know how your customers speak - get yourself off to wherever it is they hang out online - forums, Instagram, Twitter, wherever it is. Observe how they communicate and reflect their tone and vocabulary in your copy.

If you combine these two tips together in your sales approach, your customers will find it very difficult not to buy from you

 

 Here's a personal story by way of example: 

I got married last year (true story).

About 6 weeks before the wedding, I started looking around for suits.

I needed 6 suits - one for my brother, two groomsmen, 2 fathers and myself. 

(I knew I had left it slightly late, but I was confident that I'd get something).

I took a day off and went around all the local suit places. 

Normal menswear shops, custom tailors, wedding hire places, designer boutiques, etc. 

While browsing in these shops, I observed similar sales approaches from staff members: 

  • Some started by telling me about the huge range of suits they stocked;
  • The wedding hire places started by asking me when my wedding was (and then frowned at me when I said it was in 6 weeks);
  • Some told me they had suits ranging in price from x to y;
  • Some asked me how many suits I would be buying;
  • etc

I visited a ton of places and saw hundreds of suits.

But nothing was clicking with me.

And even though I am pretty relaxed about these things, I was starting to panic a little. Men sometimes are blasé about this stuff, but deep down, I did want to look good on my wedding day.

The last shop I visited was a small, independent fashion store.

It was the sort of place that sells labels that nobody has really heard of. Quite expensive too. I was actually on my way back to the car as I passed the shop, thinking that I'd wasted a whole day and had nothing to show for it. I decided to take a quick look inside. Last chance saloon. 

I poked around the small suit section and pulled out a jacket. I held it up to the light to get a better look. 

The shop owner came over. He was a pleasant guy. He just asked if I fancied putting the jacket on over my shirt and standing in front of the mirror. 

As I was putting the jacket on, I told him that I had been everywhere looking for a wedding suit but was on my way home empty-handed. 

Suit jacket on, I turned to look in the mirror. 

l loved the jacket, but it didn't look good on me. Sleeves were too long. Too baggy around the middle. I scowled back at myself in the mirror. 

The shop owner grabbed a couple of pins. A tweak in the sleeves and a pinch in the back. In the space of about 20 seconds, the jacket went from a 4/10 to an 8/10. 

As I was admiring the difference in the mirror, head cocked to one side, he said one key sentence to me.

Here are the exact words he said: 

"don't worry, we will make sure you are looking seriously sharp on your wedding day"

Boom - that was it.

I couldn't not buy from the man after he said that.

He spoke exactly to my concerns. The second he did that, the deal was 99% done. 

Now bear these things in mind: 

  • the shop had the smallest selection of suits I'd seen (I think there was about 6 or 7 in total)
  • it was the second most expensive option I had considered (I could have rented suits at a fraction of the price)
  • I hadn't even tried on the trousers

None of that mattered - I trusted that this guy was going to make me (and my best man, groomsmen, father, father-in-law) look seriously sharp on my wedding day.

And that's all I needed to hear.

That shop owner knew the score - he knew I wasn't interested in his range of suits, his price range, how often he gets deliveries, where he gets his suits from, etc. He cut through all the rubbish and spoke directly to my main concern. 

I've never been happier handing over thousands of dollars to anyone.

(And yes, on the big day itself - the suits looked ******' sharp :-) 

In ecommerce, you can use your copy and your product descriptions to do exactly what that shop-owner did to me. It's not hard either. You just have to take some time to find out the common motivations of your customers and speak to them in a way that lets them know that you understand them. 

And here's the best part:

Once you do that - price is not an issue. You can raise prices way above your competition and people will gladly pay them.

Suddenly, everything has changed.

They don't just want to buy hair extensions. They want to buy hair extensions from you

I'm not sure I can point to one difference between the wildly successful (and sustainable) Shopify stores and those that just about break even or lose money.

But creating that connection between customer and store would definitely be a main contender.

Hope that helps Collin! 

Good luck,

Nigel 

P.S. that clothes guy has a thriving Shopify fashion shop now too - who'd have ever thought it ;-)

Analogy Marketing - More Traffic, More Sales, More Profit. Guaranteed.

Analogy Marketing is a Shopify Partner Ecommerce Marketing Agency focused exclusively on Digital Marketing, Advertising, and SEO for Shopify stores.
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5 months ago
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Few things I changed are:

  • I changed the theme. My old theme was very unorganized. All the thumbnails were different sizes, some pictures were low resolution... So I purchased a different theme to give a cleaner look, and it worked.
  • I added Sales Pop by Beeketing. Someone in this thread said all the pop ups are distracting and makes the customers go away. But in my case, it worked. People were skeptical of this brand new site. I mean, would you be willing to give out your Credit Card info to a site you've never heard of? So when they started seeing other people's purchases, I guess it kind of gave them a sense of security and trust.
  • Checkout Boost app. I've only used this app for about a week now, but I've already gotten 5 orders out of it. It incentives customers to not exit the browser or leave the website with last minute deal.
  • I've started sending mails once every 3~4 days. Nobody likes spams.
  • I've spread out my ads. Before, I would spend $100 a day just on ads on instagram to try and get immediate sales. Now, I just put $100 for 5 days, and let it sit. This strategy have enabled me to not worry about ads and spend less money while getting more and longer reach.

 

That's about it. Other than that, I've been adding more products, but I think these are what actually helped me over the month.

T J Member
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5 months ago
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Nigel@Analogy Marketing.....great story!!

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5 months ago

Thanks Min for the review after a month. 

Wonder how that "someone purchased" pop up would do though if the last purchase is like 3, 4 days.. will it still said someone purchased xxx 4 days ago?  that would look bad right?

 

Posts:
4
5 months ago

Min Chung. Thank you for the advice!

Posts:
2
5 months ago

Ged,

You are 100% right and there are more.....

Rhonda Todd Member
Posts:
12
5 months ago

Thank you very much for this informative information.

Posts:
11
5 months ago

I think you need more marketing for your store.

Posts:
12
5 months ago

In order to make sales and bring true traffic to your website, you need to be active on social media.

Thomas Butler Member
Posts:
12
5 months ago

Google ads are great if you do them right. What have you tried so far?

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1
5 months ago

Hey, how did you get such a low cpc? 0.14c per click is amazing. 

Posts:
8
5 months ago

What theme are you using? I like it.